Planning For Your New Home in 2011

There are lots of purchases that are highly prone to impulse buying: shoes on sale, puppies at the pound, and carrot cupcakes with cream cheese butter cream frosting come instantly to mind. (But that’s just me.)

But houses?  Not so much. Savvy, regret-free home buying can take weeks or months of financial and lifestyle research and planning.  If you want 2011 to be the year you become a homeowner, here are 5 things you should be doing, as we speak.

1.  Minimize your holiday spending and save your cash. Instead of using the holiday sales to acquire a new winter wardrobe of cashmere sweaters, hold the discretionary spending down so you can give yourself the gift of home ownership!  If you are serious about buying a home next year, don’t run up additional credit card debt on gifts this year. Instead, make homemade cards or write holiday letters this year for everyone except the kiddos.  And even for the kids, consider scaling back on the stuff, spending more of your time with them than your money, and getting started now saving toward your home purchase. (I don’t think too many folks would argue that a less materialistic holiday season would hurt anyone, at any age.)

Kick-start your 2011 home buying resolution by starting a “Home” savings account at an high-interest, online bank (the discipline-boosting goal is a bank that isn’t super easy to transfer funds out of when you run low on cash), and set up an automatic deposit into it every payday. To get specific about your savings goal, if you’re cash-flush, obviously a 20% down payment will get you top notch interest rates and provide you with the maximum ability to manage your monthly payments. If you’re going to be more of a bootstrapping buyer, an FHA loan might be right up your alley – they offer a down payment of 3.5% of the purchase price.

All buyers should plan to have at least 3 percent of the purchase price saved up for closing costs, even if you want the seller to chip in.  The lower-priced the home you want to buy, the more percentage points you should be willing to chip in for closing costs.  It’s easy for closing costs on an $150,000 FHA loan to run as high as $4,000 or more, considering transfer taxes, inspections, appraisals and mortgage insurance fees. So, even the scrappiest buyer should have a savings target somewhere around 6.5% of their target home’s price.  To buy a $200,000 home, for example, that would mean a savings target of $13,000.

Local real estate and mortgage pros can help you clarify realistic “cash to close” expectations and savings targets for your area.

2.  Research financing, areas homes, prices, agents and online. Smart home buying takes a lot of research and knowledge-gathering.  Since most buyers find it much harder to qualify for a mortgage than it is to find a home you’d love to live in, start with studying up on home financing and what it will take for you to get a home loan (note: FHA loans are preferred by the average home buyer on today’s market who has less than a 10% down payment, so start your research there).

If you’re considering relocating next year, now’s the time to start narrowing down states, cities and even neighborhoods that may or may not work for you. Take into account the job market, housing and other costs of living, and income and property tax rates, as well as the critical lifestyle inputs that vary from state-to-state, like weather and whether the place is a personality fit for you and the life you want to live, be it urban sophisticate or outdoors adventurer.

Also, start to develop a feel for home prices in a what-you-get-for-your-money type way, and start narrowing down the home styles and even neighborhoods that might fit your aesthetic preferences and lifestyle.  If you’re one of those rare buyers-to-be who is not already obsessively house hunting, hop on my website here and register with the Virtual Home Finder to start regularly checking out homes and neighborhoods, making sure to take advantage of the neighborhood ratings and reviews feature, which empowers you to surface what other folks think and say about an area.

3.  Rehab your credit, if you need to. Go to AnnualCreditReport.com or Free Credit Report.com and check out your credit reports – from all 3 bureaus – for free. (Note – these will not give you your credit score for free – that costs extra, but it will give you the actual detailed credit reports.)  Audit them for errors and do the work of disputing inaccuracies to have them corrected. Pay particular attention to: accounts that are not yours/you never opened, derogatory information that should have “aged off” your report by now (i.e., 7 years for late payments, 10 for bankruptcies) and balances or credit limits that are inaccurate (i.e., your credit card balance is listed at $2500, but you actually only owe $250.)  These are the errors most likely to foul up your financing, so follow the instructions each bureau provides to correct them, stat. While you’re at it, don’t close any accounts, even if you are able to pay some down or off – actually, check out these tips for getting the bank to give you the best possible home loan, without unintentionally making your score worse!

4.  Run your numbers. In the past, some overextended homeowners complained that they felt pushed into a mortgage they couldn’t afford. Pundits blamed that on the real estate and mortgage industry, but I have witnessed firsthand many a home buyer push themselves or their spouses into buying too expensive of a home. Eliminate this issue entirely by doing this – run your own numbers, before you ever even talk to a salesperson or start looking at homes beyond your means. (I assure you, once you see the million dollar home you think you can afford, the $250,000 home you can actually afford will be underwhelming.)

Get your monthly finances in order, and get a clear read on how much your monthly bills are – outside of housing. Decide how much you can afford to spend every month for housing, when you buy your home.  Get clear on exactly how much cash you plan to have at hand to put into your transaction up front.  When, in the next step, you begin working with a mortgage broker, you’ll want to share these numbers with them, early on in your conversation, to empower them to tell you what home price you can afford – not based on their rubrics, but based on what you say you want to spend every month and what you want to put down.

5.  Talk to a REALTOR and begin ;planning. Trulia is a great place to find an engaged, communicative, tech-savvy real estate broker or agent in your area.  You can use our Find a Pro directory or simply start participating in the Trulia Voices Community, asking your questions and tagging them for the town where you plan to buy a home, and paying attention to the agents who give timely, thorough responses to your questions, and communicate in a language you understand.

You are welcome to drop me a line @ JoyceHazen@ymail.com, and I’d be happy to send you some literature on the beautiful Valley of the Sun, in Arizona.  We can also work on an action plan together for buying a home next year, and would like to talk with you  about what action steps need to go on the list. It’s important to always  point out for you things like when along the process to be sure your Realtor has a good understanding of what you really want.    It is sometimes wise once approved, to take take a spin out and look at a few properties to reality-check your expectations or narrow down a broad wish list.

When you do get in touch with the mortgage maven, if you’re serious about buying, you will want them to actually pull your credit report, check the actual FICO scores that come up on their system and give you their professional recommendations for what final tweaks you can do to your debts to get your credit score where it needs to be.

Advertisements

About Joyce Hazen, REALTOR, CIPS, CNE, SFR

An Arizona and Greater Metropolitan Phoenix Realtor, I am a full service professional with an International Designation, CIPS, who works with Buyers, Sellers & Investors all around the world. I have experience in both the residential and commercial communities. In addition, as a Certified Negotiation Expert I work my hardest to utilize my negotiation skills to benefit all clients. I also speak French, English and Italian. Originally from Canada, having moved to the Valley in 2000, I pay special attention to your personal individual needs and desires, to find you the home, land, or building that you’ve been dreaming of. Real Estate has given me the privilege of working with so many wonderful people and with my knowledge, tools and skill set I have been fortunate to realize that individual needs change from person to person, business to business, culture to culture, and that every request is important to you. For that very reason, when I embark on a journey, I work closely with you, whether you are buying or selling a home or commercial space, whether it is a tradition sale, short sale or foreclosure. I will help you as I am highly motivated, results driven and have taken time to research the marketplace, trends and opportunities to know how to best serve you. With my experience, culture and languages, you can rest assured that your best interests are my priority. I will help you find the home or property of your choice and professionally negotiate on your behalf. It is for these reasons that so many of my clients refer me to their friends and families. The Valley of the Sun has been one of the fastest growing U.S. metropolitan communities, Phoenix has grown tremendously over the past couple decades. Financial Institutions are working with Americans, offering terrific mortgage deals, as well as with foreign investors who are interested in purchasing second homes… the opportunities are endless. My mission and goal is to provide you with superior service. Welcoming new residents to Arizona including Americans and International clients who want to relocate permanently, a home away from home or to escape cold winters, is a pleasure! I enjoy meeting new people and always set my goals high and strive to achieve them. If you’re ready to search for the perfect property, I am here to show you the very best homes that meet your criteria.
This entry was posted in Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s